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Arunabha Ghosh and Karthik Ganesan's essay in Nature: Rethink India's energy strategy
15 May 2015

Nature journal has published a special issue this week on 'Science in India'. The issue includes a comment essay 'Rethink India's energy strategy' by CEEW researchers Arunabha Ghosh and Karthik Ganesan.

Rethink India's energy strategy

India's policy-makers have three big energy goals: providing everyone with access to energy, securing energy supply and trying to limit carbon emissions without encumbering the nation's growth. These important concerns miss the point.

Energy access cannot be assured by progress towards a simple target such as supplying power 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, nationwide. India has deep divides in the quantity and quality of energy consumed across income groups and between rural and urban households. Fuel subsidies are poorly designed and the strategies to reduce them to enhance energy security are heavy-handed. And because of limited action by the world's largest emitters, there is little left in the global carbon budget before planetary safety limits are breached. Clean energy and alternative growth is imperative.

India's energy priorities should be reframed as follows: to cater to the different energy demands of citizens of various economic strata; to direct energy subsidies to benefit the poor; and to promote low-carbon industry.

To read the complete essay, click here: http://www.nature.com/news/policy-rethink-india-s-energy-strategy-1.17508

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CEEW’s Fact of the day...
In India, around 74 million rural households lack access to modern lighting services and a larger proportion of the population (around 840 million) continue to be dependent on traditional biomass energy sources
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